New brucella strains towards re-emerging trends of Brucellosis

Taleski, Vaso (2018) New brucella strains towards re-emerging trends of Brucellosis. In: FEMS-supported symposium: “Emerging Infections”, 30 May to 2 June 2018, Ohrid, Macedonia.

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Abstract

Introduction: Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease that has a significant economic, social and public health impact. Significant changes of global ecological map identifying new species, hosts and reservoirs includes brucellosis permanently in-group of reemerging diseases. Nevertheless, disease have been eradicated successfully in most of developed countries, still remains endemic in Mediterranean region, Middle East, Asia, and Central and South America. Aim: To emphasize the importance of new, recently identified Brucella species, hosts and reservoirs that raise awareness of high potential of brucellosis as a re-emerging disease and further complication to control the spread of the disease in endemic areas and worldwide. Material and Methods Presentation of most recent reviews and published data of reported and confirmed potential new (amphibian) brucella strains in coldblooded hosts and reservoirs. Discussion: Genus Brucella until recently, represented a genetically homogeneous and clonal group of bacteria. Numerous new members were reported in recent years. Species genetically highly related to each other (> 99 %) associated with infections of numerous warm-blooded animals and humans, are classified as: 1. Terresterial mammalian hosts (Classical strains: B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, B. canis, B. ovis, B. neotomae), 2. Marine mammals (B. ceti and B. pinnipedialis), and 3. „Atypical”, (B. microti, B. inopinata, B. papionis and B. vulpis). In addition, recently isolated brucellae from cold-blooded, worldwidedistributed exotic frogs (amphibian brucellae) were reported. These new brucellae species are capable to cause localized manifestations to generalized infections of frogs. Genetically highly diverse, might represent several new brucella species or link between free living soil saprophytes and the pathogenic brucella. Therefore, frogs represents new and ecologically significant natural host and reservoir. Conclusions Identification of new, amphibian, brucella species and new hosts and reservoirs (frogs), have significant contribution to new approach of understanding of evolution of the genus Brucella from a soil-associated motile bacterium to a host-adapted pathogens. Frog’s isolates to date do not represent a zoonotic treat because, still, there is no evidence for that. Advices for precaution to avoid contacts with amphibians that maight be infected are very useful. In addition, of existing, new amphibian-brucella species, new hosts and reservoirs (frogs) increase the concerns for successful control and keeps Brucellosis permanently on the list of re-emerging diseases. Key words: brucellosis, new brucella, re-emerging, trends, reservoirs.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Keynote)
Subjects: Medical and Health Sciences > Clinical medicine
Medical and Health Sciences > Other medical sciences
Divisions: Faculty of Medical Science
Depositing User: Vaso Taleski
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2019 10:35
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2019 10:35
URI: http://eprints.ugd.edu.mk/id/eprint/22652

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