Evidence informed decision-making process: perspective from developing countries

Zisovska, Elizabeta (2017) Evidence informed decision-making process: perspective from developing countries. In: XIV HTAi 2017 Annual meeting. Towards an HTA ecosystem: From local needs to global opportunities, 17-21 June 2017, Rome, Italy. (Submitted)

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Official URL: http://www.inahta.org/event/htai-annual-meeting-2/

Abstract

Evidence-informed decision making is a global initiative that promotes the systematic use of health research evidence in policy and decision making. It means promotion of national partnerships between policy-makers, researchers and civil society representatives in order to facilitate both policy development and policy implementation through the use of the best scientific evidence available. As a result, different sectors in the country jointly address specific priorities, develop and use specific skills to assess research evidence and to integrate them in policy briefs that provide for evidence-informed decisions by high-level decision makers at both national and local level Developing countries perceive this concept clearly, because the main aim is the same worldwide-efficient, effective health care of high quality. The health care has shifted from one to another model, with different transitional periods and duration in between. Starting from fee-for-services, through pay-per-performance to the newest model value-based approach. Fee-for-services is the among the oldest models, where payment generally has little to do whether their patients’ health improves. Over the last decade, Clinical guidelines are recognized as particularly important in the context of the current challenges facing the overall health care systems, such as the rising costs of health care, introduction of expensive new technologies, increased demand for care combined with an ageing population, the variations in clinical practice and service delivery patterns among health care professionals, institutions and geographical regions. Although target users of the clinical guidelines are usually considered the physicians, other groups may benefit too, including nurses and midwives, paramedical professions, health managers, policymakers and patients. All of them perceive increasingly clinical guidelines as relevant tools for making health care more efficient, consistent, safer and for eliminating the differences between what clinicians do and what scientific evidence has demonstrated. HTA acts as ‘a bridge’ between evidence and policy-making. It seeks to provide health policy-makers with accessible, useable and evidence-based information to guide their decisions about the appropriate use of technology and the efficient allocation of resources. Different sectors in the country jointly address specific priorities, develop and use specific skills to assess research evidence and to integrate them in policy briefs.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Lecture)
Subjects: Medical and Health Sciences > Clinical medicine
Divisions: Faculty of Medical Science
Depositing User: Elizabeta Zisovska
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2017 08:26
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2017 08:26
URI: http://eprints.ugd.edu.mk/id/eprint/18653

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